Recovery #tinyhearts

unnamed-29

This is an excerpt from an article that really resonated with me.

Struggle With, Not Victory Over

Therese Borchard

It’s tempting for anyone who writes about depression and anxiety to preach from hindsight, after he has “recovered” from his mood disorder: “This is what I did to free myself from addiction” … “Here are five steps to instant weight loss” … “These are eight techniques to cure anxiety.”

If you look at the list of New York Times bestseller advice books, such simple directives fill slots 1 through 20. Because no one wants to read the secrets of a person still struggling with her diet and exercise. After fifteen bloody weeks, she is still grossed out by sweat. Few people want to read a depression memoir that ends in a psych ward, with ECT.

In her piece she quotes Bob Kellermen about the temptation for preachers to speak from a “victory over” perspective versus a more reflective, introspective “struggling with” point of view:

What effect might it have on our fellow strugglers if we talked about the battle during the battle—while we are still in the valley? How might it connect truth to life if we were honest enough to admit that we have lifelongongoing battles that we struggle with rather than that we always have “victory” over?

Balance #tinyhearts

unnamed-26

I don’t know about you, but when I think about balance, I think about managing stress. And I’ve always assumed that stress is “bad.” Now there’s a new TED talk that takes a different angle, arguing that stress may only be bad for you if you believe that to be the case. Stanford University psychologist Kelly McGonigal shows you how to see stress as a positive and introduces “an unsung mechanism” for stress reduction: reaching out to others. Over 4 million views–it’s definitely worth the 14 minutes.

2129

Kelly McGonigal on the web:

She’s author of The Willpower Instinct and The Neuroscience of Change.

Gratitude #tinyhearts

photo-68

Gratitude begins in our hearts and then dovetails into behavior. It almost always makes you willing to be of service, which is where the joy resides. It means you are willing to stop being such a jerk. When you are aware of all that has been given to you, in your lifetime and in the past few days, it is hard not to be humbled, and pleased to give back. –Anne Lamott from Help, Thanks, Wow

Here’s the first post in this series: Hearthstones.

Love #tinyhearts

unnamed-25


Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice at wrongdoing, but rejoices with the truth. Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never ends.

 1 Corinthians 13:4–8a
(English Standard Version)

***

paultillich114351

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Play #tinyhearts

unnamed-24

Play is the highest form of research. –Albert Einstein

***

The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct. –Carl Jung

***

What’s fun for other people may not be fun for you–and vice versa. –Gretchen Rubin

What’s fun for you??

photo-67

Me at a group painting class.

You can read about these #tinyheart posts here.